The Library Facelift

By William Norris, Managing Director

One of the rather crucial elements of putting on a concert is of course the music – as in, the sheet music. It’s probably not something people give a lot of thought to – it’s just there, the musicians play from it, it’s taken for granted. But of course it has to come from somewhere, and most orchestras, Tafelmusik included, have some sort of music library.

Now this blog is not going to get into the detail of how the library works or how it is catalogued or looked after – that’s perhaps the subject of a future post. But it is going to touch on the physical library.

As you may know, Tafelmusik’s offices live in the basement of the Trinity-St Paul’s Centre, and tucked behind the office is a room known as the ‘Orchestra Room’. Its name is slightly misleading however, because actually it’s primary purpose is as Tafelmusik’s Music Library – ably looked after by our Librarian Charlotte Nediger, assisted by Cristina Zacharias.

I say prime purpose because the room also does serve as a space for the orchestra to use – for the men to change and get ready before concerts and also for the orchestra as a whole to hang out and grab a refreshment during rehearsal breaks.

Added to that it has a third purpose – the only real meeting room for our offices. So, as you can imagine it’s a busy space.

As with many arts organizations we focus on investing on what goes on on stage – that’s why we exist. So our offices aren’t what you’d call glitzy or high spec. No downtown skyscraper for us! But we decided that the time had come to give our Orchestra Room a little refresh as it had become quite a dark and cluttered space and not a very nice to meet, work or hang out in.

Luckily we have a bit of a project management star in our office team – a certain Mara Brown. With her help and lots of input from musicians we worked up a plan for a refit. This was no small undertaking – the window of opportunity was small. The library is in such heavy use most of the year that big disruption is just not possible. Plus we had to remove ALL the music, store it and then put it back.

All the work was completed (amazingly) within a two week window. The biggest task was perhaps undertaken by Charlotte and Cristina who had to unpack all the stored music after the construction period, find the best way to utlise the new shelf-space(it’s deeper than before so tissue boxes were used in some places as a crafty way and then put all the music back in the right order.

That done the room is now ready for use. Many of the best things are the little things. So we now have lighting that reaches the end of the room. We have full-length mirrors (so no excuses for not looking immaculate gentlemen of the orchestra!), and for the first time all the musicians have a shelf to call their own to store their instrument and personal effects. And we have a lot more storage space – so as we continue to explore our repertoire and add to our library we now have room to store our exciting new musical discoveries.

Arrivederci Stefano

Arrivedirci Stefano

By Patrick Jordan, viola

After two years of excellent and devoted engagement with Tafelmusik, we bid a very sad farewell to our colleague, violist Stefano Marcocchi. The demands of his family in Italy are such that he has made the very difficult decision to return to Europe.

His beginning with the orchestra was auspicious. In Tafelmusik’s audition process we rarely hire someone outright — we most often propose a trial period of some sort, to make sure that the fit will work. Stefano, presenting himself as a very mature artist at our auditions, was hired immediately.

Stefano performing in "Let Us All Sing! Tafelmusik Chamer Choir at 35" with violist Patrick Jordan, and violinist Thomas Georgi. Photo credit: Trevor Haldenby
Stefano performing in “Let Us All Sing! Tafelmusik Chamber Choir at 35” with violist Patrick Jordan (right), and violinist Thomas Georgi (left). Photo credit: Trevor Haldenby

Our trust in his capacities, passion, and seriousness were well founded. As dubious luck would have it, he joined the orchestra at a moment when we had three different memorized programs in one season, all of which he learned (I think the absence of Isabella, his girlfriend and subsequent wife during that period may have nefariously worked to the orchestra’s advantage …). His broad knowledge, experience, and insatiable curiosity about the business of historically informed performance practice have been a rejuvenation for the entire orchestra.

We are of course a small band, and the violas, for most of the orchestra’s history, have been a section of two. It might not seem obvious from the outside, but two people playing one part requires an incredibly sensitive pair of players, willing to give and take on a minute and dynamic level. We were lucky to attract a fine musician with those skills, but on top of that,  I personally have gotten a new friend, which has been a dream come true.

Dreams too often skitter away, tantalizingly out of our reach. My late father, upon hearing the laments of someone who had been recently jilted, asked that person “Why can’t you just be glad that you had the fun years together that you did?” Those have been encouraging words in the last few months. Indeed, none of us will be here forever, and the good we can do is a fine measure of our efforts. Stefano leaves the orchestra, and his section-mate, considerably better in many ways than when he arrived. Arrivederci caro amico!

Leave a comment below or send your thoughts and wishes to Stefano here or at info [@] tafelmusik [.] org

 

Introducing….the Listening Club

By William Norris, Managing Director

Tomorrow evening, here at our Trinity-St Paul’s home, we’re trying something a little bit different. We have a pilot event of something called the ‘Listening Club’.

It’s intended to be the music version of a book club. There will be some set listening, and then, at the event, we’ll come together to discuss it, all in a relaxed and informal atmosphere. We hope it will give you a chance to debate, discuss and engage with our music in a different way and to learn about it, not just from the hosts of the event (see below) but also from each other.

The event will be led by Dr. Hannah French, who you might have heard recently at one of our pre-concert chats and who also presented BBC Radio 3’s recent programs about us. She’ll be joined by our very own Choir Director Ivars Taurins.

The subject at hand is Bach, and specifically arrangements on his music. During the 80-minute event Hannah and Ivars will be looking at six works, focusing on three themes – Bach the Arranger, Bach the Recycler and Bach the Re-imagined.

As mentioned, this first event is a pilot, to see if the idea works, and if audiences enjoy it. If it does, and you do, then we hope to plan more events for the 2017-18 season, which would, like this first session, all tie into aspects of our season repertoire.

The session is tomorrow, Friday the 21st, at our Trinity-St Paul’s Centre home and tickets are just $25. It’s not too late to join, you’ll just have to make sure you have time to listen to the 6 pieces beforehand!

Find out more / buy tickets 

Against the odds, the show goes on in Antigonish

By Phil Stephens, Interim Associate Director of Philanthropy

Visit St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, and you’ll find a small performance space named Immaculata Auditorium, said by CBC producers to be one of the best chamber music spaces East of Quebec. One of Canada’s oldest universities, St. Francis Xavier was founded in 1853, and the auditorium itself was built on campus in 1917. Home to performances and community events for the university and the town for a century, Immaculata remains a significant contributor to the arts and the cultural life of Antigonish.

Over the past year, the Antigonish Performing Arts Series (APA) staff, who program in the space, learned that the funding base provided by the University since 1973 would be entirely withdrawn, effectively ending the performing arts offered on stage there.

APA responded by launching a fundraising appeal to their subscriber base, with the goal of building the resources required to keep the series running for the 2017/18 Season.

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra has played in Immaculata Auditorium as part of the Series in the past, but for our upcoming Eastern Canada tour this fall, it fell off our schedule, for a reason that was not clearly defined during the time that the tour was being built. The rest of the dates filled up, and everything was scheduled out for the orchestra.

Fast forward to March 2017, and the inspiring generosity of the community around APA had successfully raised a phoenix from the ashes, and has bravely embarked on producing one more season in the hall.

Dr. Michael Steinitz

APA Director and St. Francis Xavier physics professor Dr. Michael Steinitz reached out to Tafelmusik’s Director of Artistic Operations and Administration Beth Anderson, with a request to have Tafelmusik participate in a season made possible by the strong bond of community spirit.

“Under normal circumstances, we would have said that the tour was full, but in this case I was touched by their story of resilience and determination. I felt that we could do a lot of good in this situation,” says Beth. “When we approached some of the Tafelmusik musicians (a few of whom will travel with their families) to add one more performance to an already intense tour, their answer was a resounding yes. At this critical moment of re-starting the series, we want to participate in the rally for ongoing support.”

When Dr. Steinitz heard back from Tafelmusik about the decision, his reaction was notable. “YES, YES, YES! We’re flying high since we saw your email, and will do everything to make your stay wonderful. We are very, very excited.”

Tafelmusik performing J.S. Bach: The Circle of Creation. Photo credit: Glenn Davidson

Part of the 2017/18 Antigonish Performing Arts Series, Tafelmusik is proud to bring Alison Mackay’s J.S. Bach: The Circle of Creation to Immaculata Auditorium on Friday, November 24, 2017, as part of an Eastern Canada tour that also includes Montreal, Sackville, Charlottetown, Wolfville, and Halifax.

To contribute to the APA campaign, please send a cheque made out to “The Governors of St. Francis Xavier University”, with a notation on the bottom saying “for the Performing Arts Series”, to Michael Steinitz at the Physics Department, St. Francis Xavier University, PO Box 5000, Antigonish, NS B2G 2W5. Donations will receive a tax receipt.

Opus: Testing – In conversation with Brenden Varty, Patrick Arteaga, and Curtis Perry

In our final post leading up to Opus: Testing — Period Piece, in collaboration with Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, Musica Reflecta and the Canadian Music Centre,  we would like to introduce composers Brenden Varty, Patrick Arteaga, and Curtis Perry.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects, and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

Brenden Varty: When I was at home for the winter holidays, I found myself reading a book about ‘Frosty the Snowman’ to my younger brother, who is four—nineteen years younger than me! In the front of the book, I came across the message “To: Brenden—Love: Mom, Merry Christmas!” I must have received this book when I was 3 or 4, and it struck me as a special that I was now reading a book to a loved one who was the same age as I was when I had been given it.

This got me thinking of how the meaning of the book (both symbolically and in regards to the actual story) had changed for me since I was four years old, but was again being received by a different four years old in much the same way as previously. I started to think about how the meaning the book had for me at four years old was almost definitely similar in many aspects, but undoubtedly different in some regards, as the meaning my brother was giving it now.

Of course, the different meanings it has had over time and for different people (me at four and twenty-three, my brother at four—not to mention my mother) is removed from what the object actually is – pressed tree pulp, dyed and bound. These thoughts led me to recognize that all the decorations, movies, and other objects lying around the house that at some point had meant something to me were now being given different meanings, whatever they were, by my younger brother.

It is amazing the sentiments that we can attach to inanimate objects, how they can trigger memories in us, and how we can muse about what they might mean to others.

In my piece, I took the chord progression from Handel’s Concerto Grosso op. 6 no. 11, and wrote my own melody and arrangement to go with it. This serves as the “true form” for the object. The subsequent variation uses re-harmonization techniques and is written in a more modern style which I am partial to, serving as the meaning I might ascribe to an object. The second variation uses aspects from the theme and first variation, and through cut-and-paste and newly composed material, explores the meaning someone else might give the object—there will of course be similarities between two people’s memories of the same object, and so this variation echoes the first variation while being approached in a completely different manner.

What/who did you listen to in preparing to write for period instruments?

BV: To prepare for this composition, I listened to several baroque concertos by Bach and Handel. I wanted to approach this piece conceptually, and so rather than listening to modern chamber works, I decided to explore sounds and textures that I thought fit with my overall concept, while drawing the “nuts and bolts” of the piece from a classic baroque work.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

BV: The great New York alto saxophonist and composer John Zorn has been a source of inspiration for me over the past several years. Zorn fits seamlessly into both the jazz and classical avant-garde worlds, and has developed a unique voice within his compositions. His works with chamber ensembles, big bands, string ensembles, and jazz groups all drip originality, and do not often approach extremes that might deter his listeners.


Is there a particular thread running through your recent?

Patrick Arteaga: I am often working towards creating independence between voices while still having them share a contrapuntal co-dependence. For some time I have been achieving this using harmonic concepts that use very systematic approaches, though as I become more comfortable with these processes I find myself applying these systems much more organically as I am writing. Recently my focus has been shifting to include explorations in rhythm, metre and time to achieve greater distances between contrapuntal voices: an instrument may pull out of a texture by breaking out of the collective metre or tempo before re-assimilating or developing new textures based on the new temporal dichotomy. I also find myself simplifying the thematic material that I am working with, often basing a complete piece on a short gesture. The simplified material allows me to apply more distorting processes and to find opportunities to give the performer more expressive space while giving me more control over the thematic development.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

PA: Today I’ll be Ry Cooder touring Bugs Bunny’s folk repertoire, or Bugs Bunny touring a Ry Cooder cover band.


Tell us about your interest and existing experiences with period performance (as a composer, performer, and/or listener).

Curtis Perry: I’ve always been fascinated by the relationship between new music practices and early music practices. As early music as a re-discovered performance practice movement arguably only gained traction by the mid-20th century, I feel it has come to represent a facet of contemporary music making that was initially overshadowed by trends in serialism, and what I would call the “ripe to decayed” music of composers like Poulenc and Hindemith. Today, whether I hear the “Gouldbergs” or Buxtehude, or maybe the Brandenburgs, I hear an overall sense of lightness and un-encumbrance, because I think the idea of “freedom through strictures” reigns supreme in music the same way “show don’t tell” is the famous dictum in literature. I admire that there’s a code and a regimented obsession over accepted standards and practices for early music performance, and I was delighted to be able to drop myself into a working situation where I wanted to deliberately give performers a lot of choice in the interpretation of the score, while also writing something that cleaves to the strengths of the decisions such performers would be more likely to make.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

CP: I think that we—as in likely anyone taking the time to read this—live in a decadent age. The Opus Testing call for proposals made note that we live in an era of unprecedented disposability. Somewhat paradoxically, I think that precisely because of these conditions we are living in a baroque period—where the truth seems to run increasingly rare and opulence seems necessary.

But I think it’s the sense of working through all that detritus and acknowledging it and arranging it in a way that makes some kind of sense—and handling it with care—is what makes period performance the ideal vehicle for this theme of objects and memory of lasting value.

I chose my keys simply because they are some of the few objects that have consistently stayed on my body over the past five years or so. The piece runs through a standard three-part structure: slow—fast slow, anticipation—building—release. The current title, The Key Less Turned, is an allusion to The Road Less Traveled, a book by Morgan Scott Peck. In it he offers advice for a fulfilled life. One of the arguments is that “true” love is an action that one undertakes consciously. The original title for this piece was “Let Love Locks Live,” or something like this—unapologetically metaphorical and alliterative. However, that is a terrible title, so I went for something more nuanced. I have three keys on my ring—for my building, for my apartment, and one for my suitcase that I almost never use. So, the piece is a meditation on possibility and on resisting the lure of banal, everyday existence, for the purpose of seeking to know—to know the self and others, in order to better love. In a roundabout way, then, this piece is really about that memory yet to come.

What/who did you listen to in preparing to write for period instruments?

CP: Now, don’t do what I did. And that is not to worry about listening to any period instruments, composers, or performances in particular. I’ve listened to quite a bit of it, and there are only so many ways you can, say, harmonize a descending bass, and so I figured if my memories of my favourite pieces are only vague, then perhaps I might eke my way into something that is not a pastiche and not in homage, but rather, something that is clearly learned from what came before, but also clearly a new thing—just as I suspect might be the goals of early music practitioners. That is a difficult thing to accomplish. I’m not sure if I’ve done it, but that was my goal.

What have you found most surprising about working with this instrumentation?

CP: Of course, I’m going to talk about the most different instrument in this instrumentation as compared to modern ensembles. The harpsichord is not what you might think it is on recalling its pop culture representations. The harpsichord is a bad-ass beast and it will destroy you. I am not ashamed to say I was pleasantly surprised by its power in the first reading of my piece.

Who/What serves as a primary source of inspiration for you these days?

CP: I have started teaching English as a second language in the past couple of years, and I often find inspiration in my students—I have the privilege of working with adults, and I love listening to their stories, learning about cultures, and seeing new perspectives from the students as immigrants and as new Canadians. I don’t know if that manifests in a clear way in terms of creative energy, but I have consistently found working with students to be inspiring.

Is there a particular thread running through your recent compositions?

CP: I’ve only got a couple of other recordings so far, so it’s hard to say. In addition, I think it’s doubly hard to analyze your own work. It’s like understanding your own vocal accent. It takes an outsider. I hope that I might get to the point where somebody writes about my work—even if it’s not received ideally. That would be interesting.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

CP: I think I’d like to try borrowing William Byrd’s contrapuntal sensibilities…


Meet the other composers in previous interviews: Roydon Tse & Joshua Denenberg, and Tova Kardonne & Patrick McGraw.

We invite you to join us to hear the results of Opus: Testing – Period Piece on March 26, at 7:30pm. Reserve your free tickets here. Limited tickets available!

Opus Testing: Meet the composers – Tova Kardonne & Patrick McGraw

In a previous post, we introduced two composers Roydon Tse and Joshua Deneberg from Opus: Testing- Period Piece, in collaboration with Musica Reflecta and the Canadian Music Centre.  We would like to introduce two more; please meet Tova Kardonne and Patrick McGraw.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

Tova Kardonne

Tova Kardonne: My connection to baroque music originates in dance. The ballet classes of my childhood were slanted towards baroque conventions more often than I realized, and the period music of our practice became the soundtrack of my daily life for years and years. I still find my old pointe shoes evoke a lot of emotion in me, tiny, battered, and bloodstained as they are. But I’ve been struggling with memory as a source of inspiration. It has been really hard to see the object within the era in which it lived, and not impose the whole journey that was unleashed from those beginnings on these little shoes. It was fairly late in the game that I realized that there’s no getting around the present. This present reality, the artistic practice with its over-reachings and body-punishing exigencies, that’s all going to cast its light on memory. Further, that light doesn’t taint the authenticity of the memory—or perhaps, doesn’t simply taint it—but allows me to connect the disparate pieces of life into a continuous narrative. I rebel against the little inclusions of untruth that result from that process, inevitably. And I rebel against the grand, lumbering juggernaut that this piece keeps threatening to become, much too big and fraught for the little object of memory that inspired it. So it’s a fraught little seed of music that has come out of this process, and the process of finding it has been circuitous, but fruitful.

Is there a particular thread running through your recent compositions?

Tova Kardonne: I’m noticing a shift recently. I used to describe my source of music as a black box. Every time I’d look in the box, it would be empty. Just when I had decided I didn’t need to look in the box to know that it’s empty, something would jump out. Composition was a process of listening in the dark, waiting, and letting a thing be itself. Composition was discovery, or channeling. I’m noticing that I’m less able to engage in musical composition that way these days. My head is a noisier, brighter place. It’s harder to find the black box and the quiet time to listen to the dark. In fact, the surest path back to that dark quiet space is to take all the interference and write it down. When I stop condemning the noise and the light as distractions and obstacles to my compositional source, I have begun to notice that the noise itself is the music I’m looking for. I sincerely hope it doesn’t stay this way; I much prefer the previous box scenario. In the meantime, here we are. I suppose it will stay this way until I’ve made my peace with sound and fury as a default mode.


Tell us about your interest and existing experiences with period performance—as a composer, performer, and/or listener.

Patrick McGraw

Patrick McGraw: As a small child, some of the music I remember hearing most was Vivaldi and Handel, but at the time I assimilated all types of music as an undifferentiated mass with little consciousness of style periods or sense that one could (or should) listen differently to Beethoven than to Bach. Expelled from the garden, I can no longer approach music from quite the same naive perspective, but this workshop was a chance to blur some of those distinctions in a more mature if less innocent way. I had little previous experience with period instruments as a composer. Perhaps the closest parallel was last year when I suddenly had the opportunity to write for santur, an instrument that had been entirely unfamiliar to me.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects, and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

PM: The practice of period performance is itself a form of memory reconstruction. Like any memory, it is coloured by subsequent experience. The object I chose as an inspiration to start the process was a small ceramic whistle in the shape of a fish. I began with the sound of its irregular trill as a musical idea, and blended this with a quotation from Handel, representing some of my earliest experiences hearing baroque music. In the end, the nostalgic feelings I have about the time when I used to own that whistle do not seem especially at the forefront of the final result. The memory, like that of early listening, has perhaps been filtered through and transformed by my subsequent encounters with Hindemith and Bartok, among others.

What have you found most surprising about working with this instrumentation?

PM: Composing for instruments always involves a type of dialog between one’s imagination and the voices and natural tendencies of the instruments. I was curious to see in which ways my thinking would be nudged toward the baroque. Perhaps the thing that surprised me most was the nature of the differences between period string instruments and their modern counterparts—I had been accustomed to imagining wind and keyboard instruments as evolving considerably more.

Is there a particular (conceptual/methodical/other) thread running through your recent compositions?

PM: I have been growing more interested in electroacoustic music recently, and trying to integrate some of those techniques more thoroughly into my practice, so that electroacoustic and conventional chamber music become complementary means rather than distinct activities. Another thread through many (but not all) recent compositions has been an interest in drawing more directly on my physics background as a source of inspiration. Another form of reconstruction, perhaps.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

PM: Almost anyone who plays piano professionally. Or maybe Jimmy Page—it would be pretty cool to play guitar like that for a day.


We invite you to join us to hear the results on March 26, 7:30pm! Reserve your free tickets here. Limited tickets available!

Opus Testing: Meet the composers – Roydon Tse & Joshua Denenberg

Eight Ontario-based composers have written new works for a baroque quartet that have been inspired by personal objects. These compositions will be performed by members of Tafelmusik in a casual workshop presentation part of Opus: Testing- Period Piece, in collaboration with Musica Reflecta and the Canadian Music Centre. Some of the composers sat down for a Q&A with Musica Reflecta, and we learned about their writing process, challenges, and more. Meet composers Roydon Tse and Joshua Denenberg.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

Roydon Tse. Photo credit: Tim Blonk

Roydon Tse: My piece for the Opus Testing workshop is titled Forgetting, and concerns the loss of memory and details over time. Memory is a subject that I have explored in previous works, and is a subject that remains relevant in my life as I witness loved ones lose their memories as result of poor health and age.  The concept of the piece is quite simple: I wrote a theme and upon each restatement, there is less and less of the theme present. In a way, it is a reverse series of variations in that I take away things from the theme that appears at the beginning, leaving a skeleton or core in its place. There is a bittersweet quality to the piece that reflects the sadness and hope in the face of loss, and I think that music is unique from other art forms in that we can witness its progression through time, and therefore I felt it was an appropriate concept to explore. The length restriction for the work was perfect as it allowed me to explore the implications of using what I call “subtractive” form in a miniature form before applying it to a larger work.

What have you found most surprising about working with this instrumentation?

RT: I was struck by the strength of the harpsichord at a close distance in comparison to what I imagined a harpsichord would sound like. It is such a different instrument from the piano, and as a pianist I assumed that I could write idiomatically for the harpsichord until this workshop …  Chris Bagan has been very helpful on that front!

Who/what serves as a primary source of inspiration for you these days?

RT: Bach. While he is such a prolific and important composer, he is inspiring to me because of his humility and faith, dedicating all of his energy to glorify God through his music.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

RT: The fantastic Jacob Collier, who has astounding skills as a performer on multiple instruments, arranger, and composer. He has a tremendous ear for complex harmonic progressions, and it would be amazing to hear music through his ears for a day!

Memories for harp and marimba by Roydon Tse


Tell us about your interest, and your existing experiences, with period performance, as a composer, performer, and/or listener.

Joshua Denenberg

Joshua Denenberg: I played in a baroque quartet on bassoon as an undergrad. I was terrible at it.

The Opus Testing workshop is dealing with objects and memory. How are you approaching this theme through your music?

JD: Originally there was a theme, but I gave up partway through. I more or less defaulted to a three-movement concerto-like-form—which is “period,” in a hackneyed sort of way. Some traces of my original ideas made it into the second movement.

What/who did you listen to in preparing to write for period instruments?

JD: I really didn’t change my listening in preparation. Not that I dislike baroque music or period performance (on the contrary), I just didn’t want to be “inspired by.” Aping at neo-baroque styles has been done by a lot of composers who are a lot better at writing music than I am.

What have you found most surprising about working with this instrumentation?

JD: A lot of the technical and dynamic limitations I assumed would be there are not. I also wish I had more time to dedicate to figuring out the intricacies that make this ensemble great, as the sounds and idiosyncrasies, while maybe not as complex as the contemporary, are distinct and just alien enough to the casual musician that there is a lot for modern composers to explore.

Is there a particular thread running through your recent compositions?

JD: I’m trying to be more minimal and reductive in process, probably a result of the music I’m listening to. It’s not going well.

If you could borrow someone’s musical abilities for a day, who would that someone be?

JD: Hans Zimmer, of course.


We invite you to join us to hear the results on March 26, 7:30pm! Reserve your free tickets here. Limited tickets available!